Edith Wharton quote about women from The Age of Innocence - he wondered at what age 'nice' women began to speak for themselves.
pick facebookpinterest < prevnext > picture source

he wondered at what age 'nice' women began to speak for themselves.
 Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence (1920). copy citation

edit
Author Edith Wharton
Source The Age of Innocence
Topic women personality empowerment
Date 1920
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/541/541-h/541-h.htm

Context

“Isabel Chivers and Reggie were engaged for two years: Grace and Thorley for nearly a year and a half. Why aren't we very well off as we are?"
It was the traditional maidenly interrogation, and he felt ashamed of himself for finding it singularly childish. No doubt she simply echoed what was said for her; but she was nearing her twenty-second birthday, and he wondered at what age "nice" women began to speak for themselves.
"Never, if we won't let them, I suppose," he mused, and recalled his mad outburst to Mr. Sillerton Jackson: "Women ought to be as free as we are—" It would presently be his task to take the bandage from this young woman's eyes, and bid her look forth on the world.” source

Meaning and analysis

write a note
report