James Joyce quote about pleasure from Dubliners - He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he had been outcast from life's feast.
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He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he had been outcast from life's feast.
 James Joyce, Dubliners (1914). copy citation

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Author James Joyce
Source Dubliners
Topic pleasure rectitude restriction
Date 1914
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2814/2814-h/2814-h.htm

Context

“When he gained the crest of the Magazine Hill he halted and looked along the river towards Dublin, the lights of which burned redly and hospitably in the cold night. He looked down the slope and, at the base, in the shadow of the wall of the Park, he saw some human figures lying. Those venal and furtive loves filled him with despair. He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he had been outcast from life's feast. One human being had seemed to love him and he had denied her life and happiness: he had sentenced her to ignominy, a death of shame. He knew that the prostrate creatures down by the wall were watching him and wished him gone.” source

Meaning and analysis

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