Fyodor Dostoyevsky quote about innocence from The Brothers Karamazov - As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.
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As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.
 Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov (1880). copy citation

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Author Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Source The Brothers Karamazov
Topic innocence people naivety
Date 1880
Language English
Reference
Note Translated by Constance Garnett
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28054/28054-h/28054-h.html

Context

“Fyodor Pavlovitch was drunk when he heard of his wife's death, and the story is that he ran out into the street and began shouting with joy, raising his hands to Heaven: «Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace,» but others say he wept without restraint like a little child, so much so that people were sorry for him, in spite of the repulsion he inspired. It is quite possible that both versions were true, that he rejoiced at his release, and at the same time wept for her who released him. As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.
CHAPTER II. He Gets Rid Of His Eldest Son
You can easily imagine what a father such a man could be and how he would bring up his children. His behavior as a father was exactly what might be expected.” source

Meaning and analysis

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