Nathaniel Hawthorne quote about death from The Scarlet Letter - Death was too definite an object to be wished for, or avoided.
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Death was too definite an object to be wished for, or avoided.
 Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (1850). copy citation

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Author Nathaniel Hawthorne
Source The Scarlet Letter
Topic death wish inevitable
Date 1850
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/25344/25344-h/25344-h.htm

Context

“There was a listlessness in his gait; as if he saw no reason for taking one step farther, nor felt any desire to do so, but would have been glad, could he be glad of anything, to fling himself down at the root of the nearest tree, and lie there passive, forevermore. The leaves might bestrew him, and the soil gradually accumulate and form a little hillock over his frame, no matter whether there were life in it or no. Death was too definite an object to be wished for, or avoided.
To Hester's eye, the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale exhibited no symptom of positive and vivacious suffering, except that, as little Pearl had remarked, he kept his hand over his heart. [231] XVII. THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER.” source

Meaning and analysis

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