Voltaire quote about life from Candide - man was born to live either in a state of distracting inquietude or of lethargic disgust.
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man was born to live either in a state of distracting inquietude or of lethargic disgust.
 Voltaire, Candide (1759). copy citation

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Author Voltaire
Source Candide
Topic life disgust distraction
Date 1759
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19942/19942-h/19942-h.htm

Context

“"I want to know which is worse, to be ravished a hundred times by negro pirates, to have a buttock cut off, to run the gauntlet among the Bulgarians, to be whipped and hanged at an auto-da-fé, to be dissected, to row in the galleys—in short, to go through all the miseries we have undergone, or to stay here and have nothing to do?"
"It is a great question," said Candide. This discourse gave rise to new reflections, and Martin especially concluded that man was born to live either in a state of distracting inquietude or of lethargic disgust. Candide did not quite agree to that, but he affirmed nothing. Pangloss owned that he had always suffered horribly, but as he had once asserted that everything went wonderfully well, he asserted it still, though he no longer believed it.” source
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