Gustave Flaubert quote about improvement from Madame Bovary - Is it not time to cry that the blind shall see, the deaf hear, the lame walk? But that which fanaticism formerly promised to its elect, science now accomplishes for all men.
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Is it not time to cry that the blind shall see, the deaf hear, the lame walk? But that which fanaticism formerly promised to its elect, science now accomplishes for all men.
 Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (1856). copy citation

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Author Gustave Flaubert
Source Madame Bovary
Topic improvement science fanaticism
Date 1856
Language English
Reference
Note Translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2413/2413-h/2413-h.htm

Context

“Everything tends to show that his convelescence will be brief; and who knows even if at our next village festivity we shall not see our good Hippolyte figuring in the bacchic dance in the midst of a chorus of joyous boon-companions, and thus proving to all eyes by his verve and his capers his complete cure? Honour, then, to the generous savants! Honour to those indefatigable spirits who consecrate their vigils to the amelioration or to the alleviation of their kind! Honour, thrice honour! Is it not time to cry that the blind shall see, the deaf hear, the lame walk? But that which fanaticism formerly promised to its elect, science now accomplishes for all men. We shall keep our readers informed as to the successive phases of this remarkable cure.' »
This did not prevent Mere Lefrancois, from coming five days after, scared, and crying out— «Help! he is dying!” source
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