George Eliot quote about life from Middlemarch - What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?
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What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?
 George Eliot, Middlemarch (1872). copy citation

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Author George Eliot
Source Middlemarch
Topic life difficulty
Date 1872
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/145/145-h/145-h.htm

Context

“Two days afterwards, he was dining at the Manor with her uncle and the Chettams, and when the dessert was standing uneaten, the servants were out of the room, and Mr. Brooke was nodding in a nap, she returned to the subject with renewed vivacity.
«Mr. Lydgate would understand that if his friends hear a calumny about him their first wish must be to justify him. What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other? I cannot be indifferent to the troubles of a man who advised me in my trouble, and attended me in my illness.»
Dorothea's tone and manner were not more energetic than they had been when she was at the head of her uncle's table nearly three years before, and her experience since had given her more right to express a decided opinion.” source

Meaning and analysis

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