Jane Austen quote about love from Pride and Prejudice - I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.
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I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.
 Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (28 January 1813). copy citation

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Author Jane Austen
Source Pride and Prejudice
Topic love treatment vexation
Date 28 January 1813
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1342/1342-h/1342-h.htm

Context

“Well, that is very decided indeed—that does seem as if—but, however, it may all come to nothing, you know."
"My overhearings were more to the purpose than yours, Eliza," said Charlotte. "Mr. Darcy is not so well worth listening to as his friend, is he?—poor Eliza!—to be only just tolerable."
"I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him. Mrs. Long told me last night that he sat close to her for half-an-hour without once opening his lips."
"Are you quite sure, ma'am?—is not there a little mistake?" said Jane. "I certainly saw Mr. Darcy speaking to her."” source

Meaning and analysis

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