William Shakespeare - Romeo and Juliet - O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
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O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

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Author
Source
Topic
Date
1597
Language
English
Reference
Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 2
Note
Written between 1591 and 1595 Juliet line
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Meaning, explanations and notes
 
Kwize Master In this very famous line from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Juliet expresses the dilemma she must face : Romeo is the only one she loves, but Romeo is also the only one she can’t love because of the hate that drives their respective families, the Montagues and the Capulets. This sentence is still today one of the most romantic symbols of impossible love. Juliet asks Romeo to deny his own identity, as she thinks this is the only obstacle to their union. The line contrasts their common desire and the social stress due to their birth. This replica highlights the Gordian knot of the plot, which drive them to a desperate search to reconcile the irreconcilable and will lead them to the final disaster.
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