Francis Bacon quote about power from The Advancement of Learning - the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power or of the hands.
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the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power or of the hands.
 Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning (1605). copy citation

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Author Francis Bacon
Source The Advancement of Learning
Topic power wit learning
Date 1605
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5500/5500-h/5500-h.htm

Context

“(6) Lastly, leaving the vulgar arguments, that by learning man excelleth man in that wherein man excelleth beasts; that by learning man ascendeth to the heavens and their motions, where in body he cannot come; and the like: let us conclude with the dignity and excellency of knowledge and learning in that whereunto man's nature doth most aspire, which is immortality, or continuance; for to this tendeth generation, and raising of houses and families; to this tend buildings, foundations, and monuments; to this tendeth the desire of memory, fame, and celebration; and in effect the strength of all other human desires. We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power or of the hands. For have not the verses of Homer continued twenty-five hundred years, or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter; during which the infinite palaces, temples, castles, cities, have been decayed and demolished?” source

Meaning and analysis

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