William Shakespeare quote about argument from Love's Labour's Lost - He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
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He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
 William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost (1598). copy citation

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Author William Shakespeare
Source Love's Labour's Lost
Topic argument rhetoric verbosity
Date 1598
Language English
Reference
Note Written between 1595 and 1596
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1109/pg1109-images.html

Context

“thrasonical. He is too picked, too spruce, too affected, too
odd, as it were, too peregrinate, as I may call it. NATHANIEL. A most singular and choice epithet.
[Draws out his table-book] HOLOFERNES. He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer
than the staple of his argument. I abhor such fanatical
phantasimes, such insociable and point-devise companions; such rackers of orthography, as to speak 'dout' fine, when he should say 'doubt'; 'det' when he should pronounce 'debt'- d, e, b, t, not d, e,” source

Meaning and analysis

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