Charles Dickens quote about suffering from Oliver Twist - He was too well accustomed to suffering, and had suffered too much where he was, to bewail the prospect of change very severely.
pick facebookpinterest < prevnext > picture source

He was too well accustomed to suffering, and had suffered too much where he was, to bewail the prospect of change very severely.
 Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist (1838). copy citation

edit
Author Charles Dickens
Source Oliver Twist
Topic suffering pain change
Date 1838
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/730/730-h/730-h.htm

Context

“He could think of no bad object to be attained by sending him to Sikes, which would not be equally well answered by his remaining with Fagin; and after meditating for a long time, concluded that he had been selected to perform some ordinary menial offices for the housebreaker, until another boy, better suited for his purpose could be engaged. He was too well accustomed to suffering, and had suffered too much where he was, to bewail the prospect of change very severely. He remained lost in thought for some minutes; and then, with a heavy sigh, snuffed the candle, and, taking up the book which the Jew had left with him, began to read.
He turned over the leaves. Carelessly at first; but, lighting on a passage which attracted his attention, he soon became intent upon the volume.” source

Meaning and analysis

write a note
report