G. K. Chesterton quote about honor from What's Wrong with the World - In everything on this earth that is worth doing, there is a stage when no one would do it, except for necessity or honor.
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In everything on this earth that is worth doing, there is a stage when no one would do it, except for necessity or honor.
 G. K. Chesterton, What's Wrong with the World (1910). copy citation

Context

“The joy of battle comes after the first fear of death; the joy of reading Virgil comes after the bore of learning him; the glow of the sea-bather comes after the icy shock of the sea bath; and the success of the marriage comes after the failure of the honeymoon. All human vows, laws, and contracts are so many ways of surviving with success this breaking point, this instant of potential surrender.
In everything on this earth that is worth doing, there is a stage when no one would do it, except for necessity or honor. It is then that the Institution upholds a man and helps him on to the firmer ground ahead. Whether this solid fact of human nature is sufficient to justify the sublime dedication of Christian marriage is quite an other matter, it is amply sufficient to justify the general human feeling of marriage as a fixed thing, dissolution of which is a fault or, at least, an ignominy.” source

Meaning and analysis

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