George Eliot quote about disappointment from Middlemarch - what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.
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what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.
 George Eliot, Middlemarch (1872). copy citation

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Author George Eliot
Source Middlemarch
Topic disappointment hope pain despair
Date 1872
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/145/145-h/145-h.htm

Context

“He began, not without some inward rage, to think of going away from the neighborhood: it would be impossible for him to show any further interest in Dorothea without subjecting himself to disagreeable imputations—perhaps even in her mind, which others might try to poison.
«We are forever divided,» said Will. «I might as well be at Rome; she would be no farther from me.» But what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope. There were plenty of reasons why he should not go—public reasons why he should not quit his post at this crisis, leaving Mr. Brooke in the lurch when he needed «coaching» for the election, and when there was so much canvassing, direct and indirect, to be carried on.” source

Meaning and analysis

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