Agatha Christie quote about vagueness from The Mysterious Affair at Styles - Real evidence is usually vague and unsatisfactory. It has to be examined — sifted. But here the whole thing is cut and dried. No, my friend, this evidence has been very cleverly manufactured — so cleverly that it has defeated its own ends.
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Real evidence is usually vague and unsatisfactory. It has to be examined — sifted. But here the whole thing is cut and dried. No, my friend, this evidence has been very cleverly manufactured — so cleverly that it has defeated its own ends.
 Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920). copy citation

Context

“«But the evidence is so conclusive.»
«Yes, too conclusive.»
We turned in at the gate of Leastways Cottage, and proceeded up the now familiar stairs.
«Yes, yes, too conclusive,» continued Poirot, almost to himself. «Real evidence is usually vague and unsatisfactory. It has to be examined—sifted. But here the whole thing is cut and dried. No, my friend, this evidence has been very cleverly manufactured—so cleverly that it has defeated its own ends.»
«How do you make that out?»
«Because, so long as the evidence against him was vague and intangible, it was very hard to disprove. But, in his anxiety, the criminal has drawn the net so closely that one cut will set Inglethorp free.»” source

Meaning and analysis

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