Marcel Proust quote about suffering from Swann's Way - In short, my aunt stipulated, at one and the same time, that whoever came to see her must approve of her way of life, commiserate with her in her sufferings, and assure her of an ultimate recovery.
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In short, my aunt stipulated, at one and the same time, that whoever came to see her must approve of her way of life, commiserate with her in her sufferings, and assure her of an ultimate recovery.
 Marcel Proust, Swann's Way (1913). copy citation

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Author Marcel Proust
Source Swann's Way
Topic suffering sharing approval
Date 1913
Language English
Reference
Note Translated by C. K. Scott Moncrieff
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7178/7178-h/7178-h.htm

Context

“And if Françoise was amused by the look of consternation on my aunt's face whenever she saw, from her bed, any of these people in the Rue du Saint-Esprit, who looked as if they were coming to see her, or heard her own door-bell ring, she would laugh far more heartily, as at a clever trick, at my aunt's devices (which never failed) for having them sent away, and at their look of discomfiture when they had to turn back without having seen her; and would be filled with secret admiration for her mistress, whom she felt to be superior to all these other people, inasmuch as she could and did contrive not to see them. In short, my aunt stipulated, at one and the same time, that whoever came to see her must approve of her way of life, commiserate with her in her sufferings, and assure her of an ultimate recovery.
In all this Eulalie excelled. My aunt might say to her twenty times in a minute: "The end is come at last, my poor Eulalie!" , twenty times Eulalie would retort with: "Knowing your illness as you do, Mme.” source
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