Emily Brontë quote about torment from Wuthering Heights - If she desired to go, she might: the nuisance of her presence outweighs the gratification to be derived from tormenting her!
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If she desired to go, she might: the nuisance of her presence outweighs the gratification to be derived from tormenting her!
 Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights (1847). copy citation

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Author Emily Brontë
Source Wuthering Heights
Topic torment gratification nuisance
Date 1847
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/768/768-h/768-h.htm

Context

“But tell him, also, to set his fraternal and magisterial heart at ease: that I keep strictly within the limits of the law. I have avoided, up to this period, giving her the slightest right to claim a separation; and, what's more, she'd thank nobody for dividing us. If she desired to go, she might: the nuisance of her presence outweighs the gratification to be derived from tormenting her!'
'Mr. Heathcliff,' said I, 'this is the talk of a madman; your wife, most likely, is convinced you are mad; and, for that reason, she has borne with you hitherto: but now that you say she may go, she'll doubtless avail herself of the permission.” source

Meaning and analysis

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