Charles Dickens quote about death from Our Mutual Friend - And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.
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And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.
 Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend (1865). copy citation

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Author Charles Dickens
Source Our Mutual Friend
Topic death life
Date 1865
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/883/883-h/883-h.htm

Context

“'Good-bye, my darling! Take her away, my dear John. Take her home!'
So, she leaning on her husband's arm, they turned homeward by a rosy path which the gracious sun struck out for them in its setting. And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death. And O what a bright old song it is, that O 'tis love, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round!
Chapter 5 CONCERNING THE MENDICANT'S BRIDE The impressive gloom with which Mrs Wilfer received her husband on his return from the wedding, knocked so hard at the door of the cherubic conscience, and likewise so impaired the firmness of the cherubic legs, that the culprit's tottering condition of mind and body might have roused suspicion in less occupied persons that the grimly heroic lady, Miss Lavinia, and that esteemed friend of the family, Mr George Sampson.” source

Meaning and analysis

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