Emily Brontë quote about time from Wuthering Heights - Time brought resignation, and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.
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Time brought resignation, and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.
 Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights (1847). copy citation

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Author Emily Brontë
Source Wuthering Heights
Topic time melancholy resignation
Date 1847
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/768/768-h/768-h.htm

Context

“Grief, and that together, transformed him into a complete hermit: he threw up his office of magistrate, ceased even to attend church, avoided the village on all occasions, and spent a life of entire seclusion within the limits of his park and grounds; only varied by solitary rambles on the moors, and visits to the grave of his wife, mostly at evening, or early morning before other wanderers were abroad. But he was too good to be thoroughly unhappy long. He didn't pray for Catherine's soul to haunt him. Time brought resignation, and a melancholy sweeter than common joy. He recalled her memory with ardent, tender love, and hopeful aspiring to the better world; where he doubted not she was gone.
And he had earthly consolation and affections also. For a few days, I said, he seemed regardless of the puny successor to the departed: that coldness melted as fast as snow in April, and ere the tiny thing could stammer a word or totter a step it wielded a despot's sceptre in his heart.” source

Meaning and analysis

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