Oscar Wilde quote about mind from The Picture of Dorian Gray - Every impulse that we strive to strangle broods in the mind and poisons us.
pick facebookpinterest < prevnext > picture source

Every impulse that we strive to strangle broods in the mind and poisons us.
 Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). copy citation

edit
Author Oscar Wilde
Source The Picture of Dorian Gray
Topic mind poison impulse
Date 1890
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/174/174-h/174-h.htm

Context

“"And yet," continued Lord Henry, in his low, musical voice, and with that graceful wave of the hand that was always so characteristic of him, and that he had even in his Eton days, "I believe that if one man were to live out his life fully and completely, were to give form to every feeling, expression to every thought, reality to every dream—I believe that the world would gain such a fresh impulse of joy that we would forget all the maladies of mediaevalism, and return to the Hellenic ideal—to something finer, richer than the Hellenic ideal, it may be. But the bravest man amongst us is afraid of himself. The mutilation of the savage has its tragic survival in the self-denial that mars our lives. We are punished for our refusals. Every impulse that we strive to strangle broods in the mind and poisons us. The body sins once, and has done with its sin, for action is a mode of purification. Nothing remains then but the recollection of a pleasure, or the luxury of a regret. The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it.” source

Meaning and analysis

write a note
report