Edith Wharton quote about future from The Age of Innocence - The taste of the usual was like cinders in his mouth, and there were moments when he felt as if he were being buried alive under his future.
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The taste of the usual was like cinders in his mouth, and there were moments when he felt as if he were being buried alive under his future.
 Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence (1920). copy citation

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Author Edith Wharton
Source The Age of Innocence
Topic future boredom usual
Date 1920
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/541/541-h/541-h.htm

Context

“For it was the conviction of both ladies that, under the iron despotism of his senior partners, the young man's life was spent in the most exhausting professional labours—and he had never thought it necessary to undeceive them.
The next two or three days dragged by heavily. The taste of the usual was like cinders in his mouth, and there were moments when he felt as if he were being buried alive under his future. He heard nothing of the Countess Olenska, or of the perfect little house, and though he met Beaufort at the club they merely nodded at each other across the whist-tables. It was not till the fourth evening that he found a note awaiting him on his return home.” source

Meaning and analysis

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