Mark Twain quote about home from Pudd'nhead Wilson - A home without a cat—and a well-fed, well-petted, and properly revered cat—may be a perfect home, perhaps, but how can it prove title?
pick facebookpinterest < prevnext > picture source

A home without a cat—and a well-fed, well-petted, and properly revered cat—may be a perfect home, perhaps, but how can it prove title?
 Mark Twain, Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894). copy citation

edit
Author Mark Twain
Source Pudd'nhead Wilson
Topic home cats
Date 1894
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/102/102-h/102-h.htm

Context

“When there was room on the ledge outside of the pots and boxes for a cat, the cat was there—in sunny weather—stretched at full length, asleep and blissful, with her furry belly to the sun and a paw curved over her nose. Then that house was complete, and its contentment and peace were made manifest to the world by this symbol, whose testimony is infallible. A home without a cat—and a well-fed, well-petted and properly revered cat—may be a perfect home, perhaps, but how can it prove title?
All along the streets, on both sides, at the outer edge of the brick sidewalks, stood locust-trees with trunks protected by wooden boxing, and these furnished shade for summer and a sweet fragrance in spring when the clusters of buds came forth.” source

Meaning and analysis

write a note
report