Water and life have forsaken Agrigentine. Water—the divine Nestis of the Agrigentine Empedocles—is so necessary to animated beings that nothing can live far from the rivers and the springs.
 Anatole France, The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard (1881). copy citation

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Author Anatole France
Source The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard
Topic life river
Date 1881
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2123/2123-h/2123-h.htm

Context

“The modern Girgenti lifts its high, narrow, solid streets, dominated by a sombre Spanish cathedral, upon the side of the acropolis of the antique Agrigentum. I can see from my windows, half-way on the hillside towards the sea, the white range of temples partially destroyed. The ruins alone have some aspect of coolness. All the rest is arid. Water and life have forsaken Agrigentine. Water—the divine Nestis of the Agrigentine Empedocles—is so necessary to animated beings that nothing can live far from the rivers and the springs. But the port of Girgenti, situated at a distance of three kilometres from the city, has a great commerce. “ And it is in this dismal city, ” “ upon this precipitous rock, that the manuscript of Clerk Alexander is to be found! ”
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