To yield readily—easily—to the persuasion of a friend is no merit with you.
 Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (28 January 1813). copy citation

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Author Jane Austen
Source Pride and Prejudice
Topic persuasion merit
Date 28 January 1813
Language English
Reference
Note
Weblink http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1342/1342-h/1342-h.htm

Context

“Allowing the case, however, to stand according to your representation, you must remember, Miss Bennet, that the friend who is supposed to desire his return to the house, and the delay of his plan, has merely desired it, asked it without offering one argument in favour of its propriety."
To yield readily—easily—to the persuasion of a friend is no merit with you. "To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either."
"You appear to me, Mr. Darcy, to allow nothing for the influence of friendship and affection. A regard for the requester would often make one readily yield to a request, without waiting for arguments to reason one into it.” source